Book review: Manual of Nutritional Therapeutics

Margot Gosney is Professor of Elderly Care Medicine at the University of Reading and Consultant Physician at the Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust. Here she reviews the Manual of Nutritional Therapeutics.

British Geriatrics Society

$_58Margot Gosney is Professor of Elderly Care Medicine at the University of Reading and Consultant Physician at the Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust. Here she reviews the Manual of Nutritional Therapeutics.

The 6th edition of this very detailed book has just been published: the fact that it has continued to be relevant and required reading since its first publication in 1983 indicates its usefulness. The American editors have gone out of their way to cover subjects not only in great detail, but also to provide very relevant and up to date references to support the chapters.

The section on “Recommendations for healthy elderly adults” is very detailed and some of the tables, particularly the recommended dietary allowances, are a good reference source. The detail delivered by this book enables the reader to understand many recommendations about RDA.  For zinc, they describe how endogenous losses decline as zinc absorption…

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Calling all students: win a BGS essay prize of £500!

British Geriatrics Society

BGS Logo CMYKThe BGS Movement Disorders Section award an annual prize for an essay on various aspects of Parkinsons Disease (title of which is decided upon by the section) for medical students, nursing students, therapy students and science students.

The first prize is a whopping £500; second and third prizes are also substantial at £300 and £200 respectively. The winning essay is also published on the British Geriatrics Society website.

This year’s title is “If I Had Parkinsons Disease” and the deadline for entries is 1st July 2015. Full details can be found on the BGS website, and  all entries should be sent to Joanna Gough at scientificofficer@bgs.org.uk.

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Elder Perspectives on Life and Love for Younger Generations

As Our Parents Age

book-cover-305x450Those of us lucky enough to have aging parents who live long and remain nominally healthy are often struck by the wisdom we hear as they ruminate about relationships and love in the past. To really understand what they are getting at we must toss away any notions that our parents are merely clinging to the “good old days” and instead gaze through a prism that acknowledges their wise and long-term perspective.

Karl Pillemer, Ph.D. writes, “What elders have that young people don’t is something special: the view from the end. For them it’s no longer a mystery as to how everything will turn out — it’s already happened.”

Dr. Pillemer is the author of 30 Lessons for Loving. I wrote a short Valentine’s Day post, Elder’s Share Wisdom About Love, sharing a Next Avenue review of the book, and was intrigued. I bought the book and posted it here on this blog…

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How Do YOU Feel About Getting Older?

As Our Parents Age

Created with Festisite. Created with Festisite.

Take a few minutes to read How I REALLY Feel About Getting Older, a Huffington Post article by Jane Gross, that reflects and reviews many of the most concrete problems that occur when people age.

Gross describes the frustration of living in a society that trivializes older adults while it also turns away from the wisdom of elders. At the same time, she observes, the media bombards older adults with messages urging people to overcome aging problems simply by purchasing one product or another. And then there are the media messages that reinforce the aging stereotypes held by those who have not yet started to worry about growing older…

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What’s Your Caregiving IQ? — Take the Quiz

As Our Parents Age

Screen Shot 2015-03-12 at 9.27.55 PMCheck out the caregiving IQ quiz over at the NextAvenue website. It includes some questions about how we define caregiving, what we spend on caregiving, and the costs of long-term care. I consider myself pretty knowledgeable and I missed a couple of these.

After each question the quiz shares the answer and offers some detailed explanations. It’s well worth a few minutes of your time.

Those of us with aging parents know that there’s a lot to learn!

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